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Missouri State Archives
Missouri's Germans and the Civil War

Presented by:
Dr. Ken Luebbering


Publish Date:
November 13, 2008


Presentation Length:
50 minutes 21 seconds (50:21)


Description:
Missouri's fertile valleys and wooded hills attracted thousands of German immigrants. They settled in St. Louis, smaller towns and villages, and on farms along the Missouri River. Eventually spreading throughout the state, the German immigrants transformed Missouri's economics, politics, religion, and culture. One of the most important contributions these immigrants made was through their actions leading up to and during the Civil War. Although Missouri's Germans were a group diverse in religion, dialect, and political ideals, most wanted to prove themselves loyal to their new nation. Consequently, when forces advocating secession from the Union threatened the state, many rallied to the Union cause. Dr. Ken Luebbering explores the important role Missouri's German immigrants played in the years prior to and including the Civil War. Luebbering is a writer whose published work has focused primarily on Missouri's immigrant history. He is co-author with Robyn Burnett of three books on Missouri history and culture: German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouri, and Gospels in Glass: Stained Glass Windows in Missouri Churches.


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