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What Archaeology Can Reveal About General Order No. 11

What Archaeology Can Reveal About General Order No. 11

Archaeologist Ann Raab’s research in the Bates County area offers great potential for understanding not only the destructiveness of the Civil War era, but also how the survivors of General Order No.11 were able to recover. General Order No.11, issued by Brigadier-General Thomas Ewing of the Union Army, mandated the depopulation and suspension of civil rights for residents in four Missouri counties located along the Kansas border. Private property in the region was destroyed without hearing or compensation. Raab’s discussion of her archaeological excavation in Bates County provides a better understanding of this devastating historical event and the events which led to it.

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PICTURE CAPTION: Ann Raab digs at an archaeological site in Bates County.


Confederate Women and Military Justice in the St. Louis Area

Confederate Women and Military Justice in the St. Louis Area

During the Civil War, more than 360 women accused of disloyalty passed through the office of the St. Louis Union Provost Marshal for their part in assisting the Confederate war effort. The women spied, smuggled contraband, passed mail to the South, and exhibited their support for the Confederacy in other ways. Many of them were confined to various military prisons in the region, some for several months. The women imprisoned in the St. Louis area came primarily from Missouri, as well as the rebellious states along the Mississippi River. In many cases, these women proudly admitted their Confederate loyalty and showed no remorse for the actions that led to their imprisonment. Thomas Curran investigates the activities engaged in by Southern women during the Civil War and the contributions they made to the Confederate cause.

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The Border between Them: Violence and Reconciliation on the Kansas-Missouri Line

The Border between Them: Violence and Reconciliation on the Kansas-Missouri Line

The most bitter guerrilla conflict in American history raged along the Kansas-Missouri border from 1856 to 1865, making that frontier the first battleground in the struggle over slavery. This fiercely contested boundary represented the most explosive political fault line in the United States, and its bitter divisions foreshadowed an entire nation torn asunder. The Border between Them recounts the exploits of John Brown, William Quantrill, and other notorious guerrillas, but it also uncovers the stories of everyday people who lived through the conflict. Author Jeremy Neely examines the significance of the Border War on both sides of the Kansas-Missouri line and offers a comparative, cross-border analysis of its origins, meanings, and consequences.

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Missouri Wine Country: St. Charles to Hermann

Missouri Wine Country: St. Charles to Hermann

Before Prohibition, Missouri was the second largest wine-producing state in the nation, and, for a short time during the Civil War, it was number one. Today, the state's lush green land overlooking the Missouri River is recognized as America's first wine district. Parts of this district have produced wine since the 1830s, when German immigrants from the Rhine River Valley settled in Missouri. Towns in Missouri's wine country, which include Augusta, Defiance, Washington, Dutzow, and Hermann, are known for their rich history and German culture. The area is also known as home to the famous Missouri Weinstrasse, a two-lane "wine road" that winds through the woods and valleys of southeast St. Charles County, and the Hermann Wine Trail, which stretches 20 miles along the river between Hermann and New Haven. In Missouri Wine Country, authors Don and Dianna Graveman utilize over 200 vintage images to take readers on a scenic trip through Missouri's wine country, past and present.

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Ozarks Gunfights and Other Notorious Incidents

Ozarks Gunfights and Other Notorious Incidents

After the battle between the Blue and the Gray had ended, people in the Ozarks were still witnessing a war. Divided loyalties gave rise to rampant lawlessness, plaguing the region with robberies, shootouts, and showdowns. Author Larry Wood shares the shocking incidents that took place in the Ozarks during the late 1860s through the 1950s, including the notorious Springfield showdown between Davis Tutt and Wild Bill Hickok and the Roscoe shootout that resulted in the murder of a Younger brother. Wood even reveals some not-as-well-known, but equally scandalous crimes, such as the bank holdup by female bandit Cora Hubbard and the Bloody Benders' massacre.

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Driving Across Missouri: A Guide to I-70

Driving Across Missouri: A Guide to I-70

Drivers speeding across Missouri on I-70 might not know what they are missing, but authors Ted Cable and LuAnn Cadden do. According to them, untold attractions right along the highway between St. Louis and Kansas City await travelers in Missouri. Driving Across Missouri is packed with fun-filled information, stories, and trivia that help travelers look beyond the passing blur to appreciate Missouri's unique landscapes and landmarks. The book's authors unfold the natural beauty of the state's flora, fauna, and rivers; introduce the history of Native Americans, French explorers, and German settlers; reopen routes traveled by Daniel Boone and Lewis and Clark; and bring the Civil War era to life. Throughout their book, Cable and Cadden help to slow things down in the fast lane so that travelers can enjoy Missouri's land and history, while simultaneously making a long trip pass more quickly with stories that interpret the spirit of the great "Show Me" state.

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American Courage, American Carnage

American Courage, American Carnage

Only one U.S. Army regiment, the 7th Infantry, has served in every war from 1812 through the present day. No American unit has earned more battle streamers and few can boast more Medal of Honor winners. In American Courage, American Carnage, military historian John C. McManus tells the dramatic story of the 7th Infantry's combat experiences from the Battle of New Orleans through the end of World War II. McManus provides an inside look at the drama and tragedy of war, from America's early 19th century struggles as a fledgling republic to its emergence as a superpower in the 20th century. Based on nearly a decade of archival research, battlefield visits, interviews, and intensive study, this book is a moving, authoritative tale of Americans in combat. The story is told through the eyes of the soldiers, allowing readers to witness ordinary Americans in extraordinary circumstances.

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Missouri Railroad Pioneer: The Life of Louis Houck

Missouri Railroad Pioneer: The Life of Louis Houck

Known as a lawyer, journalist, entrepreneur, historian and philanthropist, Louis Houck is also considered the "Father of Southeast Missouri." Houck brought the railroad to the region and opened the area to industrialization and modernization. In this new biography, Joel Rhodes tells how this self-taught railroader constructed a network of 500 miles of track through the wetlands known as "Swampeast" Missouri from 1880 to the 1920s. These "Houck Roads" provided a boost for population, agriculture, lumbering and commerce that transformed Cape Girardeau and the surrounding area. In telling the story of Houck's railroading enterprise, Rhodes chronicles Houck's battle with the Jay Gould railroad empire and offers key insight into the development of America's railway system, from the cutthroat practices of ruthless entrepreneurs to the often-comic ineptness of start-up rail lines.

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The Santa Fe Trail in Missouri

The Santa Fe Trail in Missouri

For 19th century travelers, the Santa Fe Trail was an indispensable route stretching from Missouri to New Mexico and beyond. The section from St. Louis to Westport, known as "The Missouri Trail," offered migrating Americans their first experience with the West. Anyone who wanted to reach Santa Fe first had to travel the width of Missouri. In The Santa Fe Trail in Missouri, Mary Collins Barile offers an introduction to Missouri's section of the trail, providing an account of its historical and cultural significance. Barile shares how the route evolved from Indian paths, trappers' traces and wagon roads and how the experience of traveling the Santa Fe Trail varied even within Missouri. The book highlights the origin and development of the trail, offers a brief description of what travelers could expect to find in frontier Missouri and describes some of the major people associated with the trail.

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Open City: True Story of the KC Crime Family, 1900-1950

Open City: True Story of the KC Crime Family, 1900-1950

Open City: True Story of the KC Crime Family details an historical account of the birth and growth of organized crime in Kansas City during the first 50 years of the twentieth century. William Ouseley, a retired supervisor of the Organized Crime Squad, Kansas City Field Division, waged a 21 year battle against the modern day Kansas City "crime family." Over a period of years, he researched the facts, stories and legends that led to Kansas City's reputation as a wide open, anything goes city, dominated by a powerful political machine and the organized crime syndicate. Ouseley' s FBI experience makes possible an in-depth analysis of the historical materials that make up this true story. Ouseley shares the story of a captive city, unbridled politicians, powerful and colorful mob bosses, gangland murders, racket activities and courageous police officers and reformers.

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Occupied Women: Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War

Occupied Women: Gender, Military Occupation, and the American Civil War

In the spring of 1861, tens of thousands of young men formed military companies and offered to fight for their country. By the end of the Civil War, nearly half of the adult male population of the North and a staggering 90 percent of eligible white males in the South had joined the military. With their husbands, sons and fathers away, many women took on additional duties and faced alone the ordeal of having their homes occupied by enemy troops. During occupation, the home front and the battlefield merged to create an unanticipated second front where civilians, mainly women, resisted what they perceived as unjust domination. In Occupied Women, 12 distinguished historians consider how women’s reactions to occupation affected both the strategies of military leaders and ultimately even the outcome of the Civil War. Contributor and editor LeeAnn Whites, examines the common experiences of occupied women and addresses the unique situations faced by women during the Civil War, both Union and Confederate.

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The Civil Rights Legacy of Harry S. Truman

The Civil Rights Legacy of Harry S. Truman

On July 26, 1948, President Harry S. Truman issued Executive Order 9981, bringing an end to racial segregation within the ranks of the United States military forces. His decision surprised both liberals and conservatives. By the end of the Korean War in 1953, the U.S. military was almost completely desegregated. As a result of this and other acts, Truman's contribution to civil rights is generally viewed as significant. However, there are some historians who disagree. Editor Raymond Geselbracht shares this dialog and examines the meaning of some of President Truman's most important decisions and the foundation they laid for later civil rights achievements.

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Five Stars: Missouri's Most Famous Generals

Five Stars: Missouri's Most Famous Generals

Missouri’s history reveals many brave and adventurous military leaders. In Five Stars, James F. Muench profiles five of the best-known figures: Alexander William Doniphan, Sterling Price, Ulysses S. Grant, John J. Pershing, and Omar Bradley. These men represent a number of historical eras—from the Mexican-American War through World War II—and a variety of social and cultural backgrounds. Muench explores the lives and times of these celebrated generals and their roles in American history, particularly their battlefield exploits. While noting their diversity, Muench is also careful to emphasize the connections and commonalities among these leaders.

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Pot Roast, Politics, and Ants in the Pantry: Missouri's Cookbook Heritage

Pot Roast, Politics, and Ants in the Pantry: Missouri's Cookbook Heritage

For almost two hundred years, Missouri’s cookbooks have helped readers serve up tasty dishes, but these publications also provide history lessons, document changing food tastes, and demonstrate the cultural diversity of the state. In Pot Roast, Politics, and Ants in the Pantry, Carol and John Fisher draw from more than 150 publications to reveal Missouri’s cookbook heritage and deliver a generous sampling of recipes. The authors review manuscript cookbooks from 1821 St. Louis, then progress through the years and around the state before arriving at today’s online recipes. Along the way, they dish out servings of kitchen medicine, household hints, and cookbook literature, providing a smorgasbord of reading pleasure for cookbook collectors, chefs, and historians.

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A New Perspective on the Death of Meriwether Lewis

A New Perspective on the Death of Meriwether Lewis

Meriwether Lewis, leader of the Corps of Discovery, lived only a few years after his famous expedition, and October 11, 2009 marked the bicentennial of his sudden, mysterious death. Thomas Danisi utilizes original Lewis and Clark documents and previously unexamined sources to reveal new information about the character and life of Meriwether Lewis. Instead of focusing on the legendary journey, he concentrates on Lewis’s life before the trip and the post-expedition challenges he faced as governor of the Louisiana Territory. After addressing both the conspiracy theories regarding murder as the cause of his death and the longstanding belief that he committed suicide, Danisi proposes a new theory about Lewis’s untimely death.

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Fading Memory: The Missouri State Museum’s Struggle to Preserve Missouri’s History through Flags

Fading Memory: The Missouri State Museum’s Struggle to Preserve Missouri’s History through Flags

The Missouri State Museum is the steward of over 442 unique flags. The flags represent Missourians’ participation in politics and military service from the Seminole War through Desert Storm. Katherine Keil, Curator of Collections for the Missouri State Museum, presents a program highlighting the dangers posed to Missouri’s historic artifact collections and the problems with preserving tangible history. In hopes of saving vital links to the past, preservationists struggle every day against fading public interest, objects’ inherent faults, and environmental factors that cause historic artifacts to decay.

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The Indomitable Mary Easton Sibley: Pioneer of Women’s Education in Missouri

The Indomitable Mary Easton Sibley: Pioneer of Women’s Education in Missouri

Acknowledged as a significant figure in the history of women on the early western frontier, Mary Easton Sibley may be little known to modern readers. Yet, as wife to the Indian factor at Fort Osage, she became one of the most innovative and influential pioneer teachers. Ultimately, she founded Lindenwood University, a school that continues to thrive today. Although Sibley’s life has been told in older accounts, Kristie Wolferman’s book is the first to fully draw on Mary and George Sibley’s journals and letters, which shed light on Sibley’s views regarding women’s social and political roles, slavery, temperance, religion, and other topics. Wolferman depicts not merely a frontier heroine and educational pioneer but an assertive woman who did not hesitate to express unconventional views. This biography not only brings to life one of Missouri’s most remarkable women educators, but also demonstrates how her story reflects educational, religious, and social developments in both the state and the nation.

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Painting Missouri: The Counties en Plein Air

Painting Missouri: The Counties en Plein Air

In Painting Missouri, award-winning artist Billyo O’Donnell captures the state of Missouri by creating an outdoor painting on location—en plein air—for each of Missouri’s 114 counties, plus the city of St. Louis. Accompanying the paintings are essays by Karen Glines, who provides essential historical information about the counties, from interesting facts about their names to the stories behind their courthouses. Drawing on her extensive research in local historical societies, Glines shares the early histories of the state’s diverse regions, including local anecdotes, Civil War stories, and insights into the roles of Native Americans in regional history. Through a unique combination of words and art, the paintings and essays combine to create a rich portrait of the Show-Me state.

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The Ioway in Missouri

The Ioway in Missouri

Though not as well known in the annals of Missouri history as their long-time enemies the Osage, the Ioway Indians have resided within the state’s borders since at least the mid-eighteenth century and, by the opening decade of the nineteenth century, claimed all of the state north of the Missouri River. However, Ioway control over the land was short-lived, and, by 1837, the tribe was confined to a two hundred square-mile reservation in northeast Kansas. The westward expansion of the United States and the economic and social changes that came with it altered the lives of the Ioway forever. Greg Olson, Curator of Exhibits and Special Projects at the Missouri State Archives, presents an engaging look at the people, culture, and history of one of Missouri’s most historically significant Indian tribes.

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Americanization of a German Immigrant Church

Americanization of a German Immigrant Church

German immigrants organized the German Central Evangelical Church of Jefferson City in 1858. By 1918, the church was thoroughly Americanized. The history of the church serves as an example of similar transformations undergone by other immigrant churches. Americanization can be traced through four aspects: strong support of free public education; patriotism during war time and development of democracy in church governance; increasing participation in civic life; and acceptance of English as the language of congregational life. To celebrate the German Central Evangelical Church’s sesquicentennial in 2008, the congregation, now the Central United Church of Christ, published a history of its role as a mainstream American church. Walter Schroeder shares the story of the German Central Evangelical Church and discusses how its history reflects the progressive Americanization of German immigrants.

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"I Goes to Fight mit Siegel": Missouri's Germans and the Civil War

"I Goes to Fight mit Siegel": Missouri's Germans and the Civil War

Missouri's fertile valleys and wooded hills attracted thousands of German immigrants. They settled in St. Louis, smaller towns and villages, and on farms along the Missouri River. Eventually spreading throughout the state, the German immigrants transformed Missouri's economics, politics, religion, and culture. One of the most important contributions these immigrants made was through their actions leading up to and during the Civil War. Although Missouri's Germans were a group diverse in religion, dialect, and political ideals, most wanted to prove themselves loyal to their new nation. Consequently, when forces advocating secession from the Union threatened the state, many rallied to the Union cause. Dr. Ken Luebbering explores the important role Missouri's German immigrants played in the years prior to and including the Civil War. Luebbering is a writer whose published work has focused primarily on Missouri's immigrant history. He is co-author with Robyn Burnett of three books on Missouri history and culture: German Settlement in Missouri: New Land, Old Ways, Immigrant Women in the Settlement of Missouri, and Gospels in Glass: Stained Glass Windows in Missouri Churches.

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Haunted Missouri: A Ghostly Guide to the Show-Me State’s Most Spirited Spots

Haunted Missouri: A Ghostly Guide to the Show-Me State’s Most Spirited Spots

Mysterious cold spots, disembodied voices, and smoky apparitions are just a few of the ghostly goings-on encountered by journalist Jason Offutt during his trek across Missouri. Offutt conducted hundreds of interviews and visited a variety of places, including Civil War battlefields, university halls, and infamous mansions, in search of restless spirits. A serious but witty look at Missouri's place in the ghostly realm, Haunted Missouri brings together history, folklore, and just enough mystery to intrigue skeptics and delight believers. Offutt provides a detailed guide to Missouri's paranormal hot spots, with new research and accounts that rank Missouri as one of the spookiest states in America. In addition to teaching journalism courses at Northwest Missouri State University, Jason Offutt is a syndicated columnist whose work has appeared in the Kansas City Star, Missouri Life, and The Examiner

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Missouri Caves in History and Legend

Missouri Caves in History and Legend

The state of Missouri boasts more than six thousand caves in an unbelievable variety of sizes, lengths and shapes. In Missouri Caves in History and Legend, H. Dwight Weaver takes readers deep underground to shed light on how caves contributed to the settlement, social, economic and cultural development of Missouri. Weaver describes how these underground places were used for burial sites, moonshine stills, hideouts for Civil War soldiers and outlaws and even as venues for underground dance parties in the late nineteenth century. He explores the early uses of caves for the mining of saltpeter, onyx and guano; as sources of water; for cold storage and as livestock shelters. Today, explorers prowl this underground world in search of knowledge and to protect endangered species.

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Scoundrels to the Hoosegow and Other Writings of Morley Swingle

Scoundrels to the Hoosegow and Other Writings of Morley Swingle

Morley Swingle shares true stories from his legal career, providing a "behind-the-scenes" look at the justice system. Swingle combines actual crimes, legal analysis and humor to recreate his most entertaining stories of villains, heroes and ordinary people, from the crime scene to the courtroom. Relating cases included in his book, Scoundrels to the Hoosegow, Swingle describes the life of a prosecuting attorney and the "Perry Mason" moments that happen when unforeseen events cause a trial to shift direction dramatically. With wry humor, Swingle reveals the outcome of each scoundrel's antics, and how each earned a trip to the Hoosegow. Swingle also provides insight into the writing and historical backgrounds of his other two novels, The Gold of Cape Girardeau and Bootheel Man.

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Mobilizing the Masses: World War II Home Front Posters

Mobilizing the Masses: World War II Home Front Posters

Jay Antle, assistant professor in the Department of History at Johnson County Community College in Overland Park, Kansas, speaks about the use of posters to rally public support during World War II. In the name of patriotism, colorful posters were produced by the U.S. government encouraging all Americans to do their part in winning the war. Promoting ideas of conservation, women workers, and war bonds, these posters were commonplace on the home front. Each one was carefully designed to convey social, economic, and political ideas through imagery. By featuring the middle class home, traditional families, and free enterprise, these posters attempted to convey a sense of urgency aimed at maintaining the idealized American way of life, and brought the war to the home front and made the war personal, serving as a visual call to arms for all Americans.

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The Civil War's First Blood: Missouri 1854-1861

The Civil War's First Blood: Missouri 1854-1861

During the 1850s, as arguments over states' rights and slavery escalated, Missouri became one of the most highly volatile regions in the nation. Friends, families and neighbors often found themselves on opposite sides because of the strong ties Missouri had with both the North and the South. The Civil War's First Blood explains the political atmosphere in Missouri prior to the Civil War and the divided loyalties of its citizens. Authors John Bradbury and James Denny discuss the complicated role Missouri played during the first year of the Civil War, key political and military figures involved, military operations carried on throughout the state and the effects of the war on Missourians during the early part of the conflict. Bradbury and Denny tell the story of the tragic and violent part Missouri played in the beginning of the struggle that tore the nation apart.

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Evolution of a Missouri Asylum: Fulton State Hospital, 1851-2006

Evolution of a Missouri Asylum: Fulton State Hospital, 1851-2006

Over one and a half centuries ago, at a time when mental health was barely understood, Fulton State Hospital was established as Missouri's first state mental asylum. As the first such institution west of the Mississippi, the hospital's history traces not only the history of the state, but also the evolution of mental health care in the nation. Co-authors Richard Lael, Barbara Brazos, and Margot Ford McMillen address the institution's problems of overcrowding, financial mismanagement, racism, and wrongful confinement, along with its successes in new treatments involving psychotherapy and drugs. Their book offers an insightful exploration of the difficulties the state institution faced as it transformed to meet the demands of Missouri's mentally ill.

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Sabra Tull Meyer: A Sculptor's Journey Through Missouri History

Sabra Tull Meyer: A Sculptor's Journey Through Missouri History

Sabra Tull Meyer is one of Missouri's premier sculptors, having created life-like bronze sculptures for over 30 years. Her work can be seen throughout the state, most notably in the rotunda of the State Capitol, where several of her busts grace the Hall of Famous Missourians, including those of Edwin Hubble and Dale Carnegie. Perhaps the greatest achievement of her career will be the Corps of Discovery monument scheduled to be unveiled this year at the Jefferson Landing State Historic Site. This bronze sculpture of Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, York, George Drouillard, and the Newfoundland dog Seaman stands eight feet tall and weighs 5,000 pounds. Meyer discusses her journey through both art and history to create these pieces, including the careful research necessary to replicate period dress and equipment, her use of re-enactors as models and the method for turning 2½ tons of molten bronze into a piece of the past.

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African-American Genealogy: Putting Together the Pieces of Your Past

African-American Genealogy: Putting Together the Pieces of Your Past

Traci Wilson-Kleekamp, Family History Research Consultant, explores the resources available online and in local, state and national historical repositories that help family historians discover more about their African-American heritage. This five-part series provides helpful tips on accessing the best websites, which records are most beneficial, and how to get the most out of original records. Together, "What's Out There?;" "What's Your Story?: Finding It on the Web;" "How Do I Find Out More?;" "What Happened During the Wars?;" and "How Do I Put All the Information Together?" teach researchers to use all the pieces they find to gain a better understanding of those who came before them.

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The Meaning of the Mark: Advertising Symbols from the Missouri State Archives

The Meaning of the Mark: Advertising Symbols from the Missouri State Archives

Jennifer McKnight explores the Missouri State Archives Trademark Collection, which includes thousands of images from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century. The program includes logos from across the state that both remind us of yesteryear and teach us about our culture and history. McKnight is assistant professor in the Art and Art History Department at the University of Missouri-St. Louis and education chair for the St. Louis chapter of the American Institute of Graphic Arts. She has completed work for the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Saint Louis City Museum, among others, and has had her designs, illustrations, and writing published in numerous magazines.

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Arrow Rock: Crossroads of the Missouri Frontier

Arrow Rock: Crossroads of the Missouri Frontier

Arrow Rock, the state's oldest historic site, was established in 1829 at the intersection of the Missouri River and the Santa Fe Trail. As a primary center of trade between St. Louis and Kansas City, it became a "crossroads of the Missouri frontier," and home to three Missouri governors and the preeminent American painter George Caleb Bingham. Although the town's prominence declined after the Civil War, it was revived as a model of historic preservation in the twentieth century and remains a cultural tourist hot spot today. Michael Dickey discusses his award-winning book on Arrow Rock, from its rise to prominence on the frontier to its current role as a National Historic Landmark. Dickey, the historic site administrator at Arrow Rock since 1995, used a variety of sources - documents, oral histories, maps, and archaeological evidence - to complete this book, the first comprehensive history of the area ever to be published.

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Reflections of the Kansas City Riot of 1968

Reflections of the Kansas City Riot of 1968

The Reverend David K. Fly was ordained to the Episcopal priesthood in 1966 and began his ministry as Canon Pastor of Grace and Holy Trinity Episcopal Cathedral in Kansas City, Missouri. Fly served in urban , rural and campus ministries throughout the Midwest, and since his retirement in 1998, has been writing about his experiences. Fly's article, "An Episcopal Priest's Reflections of the Kansas City Riot of 1968," was recently published in January 2006 Missouri Historical Review, and this work is the topic of his presentation. He has also completed a full memoir, Faces of Faith-Reflections in a Rearview Mirror.

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PICTURE CAPTION: Kansas City Star photo, Courtesy Illus Davis Papers, Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Missouri-Kansas City


Missouri Courthouses: Building Memories on the Square

Missouri Courthouses: Building Memories on the Square

Dennis Weiser discusses his new book, a pictorial review of Missouri's 114 county courthouses. Over three hundred images richly illustrate portraits of existing exteriors, architectural features and unique interior elements of design, as well as pictures of courthouses long ago removed from the landscape. From the earliest log structures to the 19 courthouses constructed in Missouri under the Public Works Administration (1934 - 1941), to the current trend of building annexes that save the courthouse proper for administrative or judicial functions, our courthouses are true public service buildings. Each must meet very real public demands for accessibility and increased response, while managing to meet citizens' more romantic notions of "what a courthouse should look like."

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Listening to the Still Small Voice: The Story of George Washington Carver - An Interview with Paxton J. Williams

Listening to the Still Small Voice: The Story of George Washington Carver - An Interview with Paxton J. Williams

Williams is the author of a one-person play telling the story of George Washington Carver. Born into slavery near Diamond, Missouri, George Washington Carver endured a difficult and dangerous childhood and acquired an excellent education that complimented his innate understanding of botanical science. Invited to join Booker T. Washington's Institute, Carver became known as the "Wizard of Tuskegee" and virtually revolutionized the southern agrarian economy by freeing it from continued dependence on cotton. Carver's more than 300 uses for the peanut, and hundreds more for soybeans, were simply part of his desire to "fill the poor man's empty dinner pail." He largely refused to patent or profit from his many inventions and products.

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In the Spirit of Yellow Eyes: A Cultural Legacy

In the Spirit of Yellow Eyes: A Cultural Legacy

Dorothy Eiken, an enrolled member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, discusses the many ways she connects with her past as an artist, through traditional Sioux history, Lakota culture and Native American spirituality. Special focus is given to the memory of her great, great grandmother, Yellow Eyes, who was with Sitting Bull at the Battle of Little Bighorn, fled with him to Canada in 1877 and accompanied him on his return to this country and subsequent surrender in 1881.

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